Monthly Archives: March 2016

Testing for Nosema – April 11, 2016

Microscope Workshop: Identifying Nosema and Pollen Under the Microscope

April 11, 2016 – 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location Change: Farm Bureau Downstairs Meeting Room [ map ]

Join the Surry Beekeepers for this important workshop to learn how to identify Nosema using microscopes provided by the NC State Beekeeper Association.  Surry member and NCSBA Regional Director Eugene Brown will be demonstrating proper use of the microscopes and how to prepare a sample to test for nosema.  He will also be providing some fascinating information on how pollen looks under the microscope.

If you would like to have your hive tested, you will need to collect about 25 worker bees from the top of your hive (under the top cover is best).  You will need to kill these bees by dropping them in alcohol.  The bees should be collected as close to the meeting date as possible because once they start to decompose, the results are not useful.

If you have questions, please email foragers@surrybeekeepers.org and Eugene will answer your questions.

Tim Holt Bees for Sale – March 26, 2016

Please read this entire message or you might miss the boat on this opportunity! There is a message from Tim at the end.

Date and Time: Saturday, March 26th at 8:00 am (latest update)
Location: 3245 Smithtown Road, East Bend, NC 27018 (directions below)

If you want to buy 5 frames of bees plus a queen from Tim Holt, you will need to bring a nuc box or hive box that is already ready for filling and transporting.  That means that screens must be closed so as you put bees in the box, they won’t be streaming back out.  Apparently this was an issue last year.

1.  Bring your hive box or nuc box—have space for 5 frames of bees and honey/pollen.
** If you have an 8 or 10 frame box, bring empty frames to complete the space, you will get 5 frames of  bees.
***make sure you have a screen or cover so bees can travel but not escape.

2.  Cost is $115.00, cash only—have exact change.

3.  Someone will go into the hive, you inspect and accept that queen and bees, they will put the 5 frames of bees into your box, you take them home.

Here are the directions to the bee yard from Tim:

I HAVE CHOSEN A PLACE THAT IS FAIRLY EASY TO GET TO AS LONG AS IT IS NOT REAL WET. THE ADRESS IS 3245 SMITHTOWN ROAD, EAST BEND, NC 27018. YOU CAN DRIVE THROUGH THE ROAD TO ANOTHER ROAD WHICH IS HWY 67 YOU CAN MAKE A CIRCLE AROUND THIS ROAD AND NO ONE WILL BE BLOCKED IN, THE DIRECTIONS IS GO TO THE END OF SILOAM ROAD, TURN LEFT GO A QUARTER OF A MILE THE BEE YARD IS ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE ROAD JUST A REMINDER THE SPLITS WILL CONSIST OR 3 FRAMES OF BROOD, AND 2 FRAMES OF HONEY AND POLLEN .ALL FRAMES WILL HAVE BEES ON THEM. WE SHOULD ALL WORK TOGETHER AND NOT ALL OVER THE BEE YARD. IT IS A BIG YARD OF BEES AND DON’T WANT TO SKIP ANY HIVES. AND PLEASE BRING CASH PLEASE. 115 DOLLARS EACH. PLEASE HAVE YOUR HIVES SCREENED UP WHEN YOU ARRIVE SO THERE IS NO ROBBING AMONGST THE BEES, AND HAVE 5 FRAMES OUT OF YOUR HIVES SO WE CAN PUT 5 FRAMES IN YOUR HIVE. THANKS TIM HOLT

NCDA&CS partners with FieldWatch

Program aims to improve communication between farmers and pesticide users.

The N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has joined 13 other states in partnering with FieldWatch, an online mapping service to help prevent crop damage and bee deaths due to accidental/unintended pesticide drift. Producers of horticultural and organic crops can map their field location using the DriftWatch program. As a companion program, BeeCheck will allow hive owners to map the locations of beehives. Pesticide applicators can access both databases before treating a field to identify sensitive sites that are close to the spray areas.

“This program is voluntary, non-regulatory and free to use,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler.

“Other states, especially in the Midwest, have had great success in getting pesticide users, farmers and beekeepers to use the site to reduce the effects of accidental drift. We hope to see similar results here.”

Growers, beekeepers and pesticide users can access DriftWatch and BeeCheck at www.ncagr.gov/pollinators. The website offers detailed instructions on how to sign up and use the mapping tools. Producers of high-value specialty crops, such as tomatoes, tobacco, fruit trees, grapes and vegetables can map their sites and provide contact information about their operation on DriftWatch. Using BeeCheck, beekeepers map their hives using pins and half-acre circles and can choose which details of hive information are displayed on the map.

“This program should help specialty crop producers, beekeepers and pesticide users be good neighbors and work together to protect our pollinators and avoid drift on sensitive crops,” Troxler said. “We hope to spend the next several months meeting with grower groups and working with Cooperative Extension and the N.C. Farm Bureau to explain how DriftWatch works and how to use the online tools. I think this can be a valuable tool for our agricultural community.”

This program was purchased with a grant from the Pesticide Environmental Trust Fund. It is part of the department’s ongoing efforts to protect and increase valuable pollinators in the state.