Monthly Archives: September 2017

Christmas Party – December 9, 2017

merry-christmasJoin us for the annual Christmas Party at 6:00 pm on December 9th.

We will be meeting at The Lantern Restaurant at 304 North Main Street, Dobson, NC 27017 [ map ].

Attendees pay for their own meals. As always, there will be a lot of door prizes. You must be an active member to get a ticket for the door prize give-aways.

Horne Creek Farm Cornshucking Frolic – 10/21/17

SCBA booth at Horne Creek Farm Cornshucking Frolic

Saturday, October 21st 10 am – 5 pm
308 Horne Creek Farm Rd, Pinnacle, NC 27043
[ map ]

The Surry Beekeepers will have a table at the Cornshucking Frolic again this year. This is a great event and a great chance to educate the public about honey bees and beekeeping. Come join us!

Get on board and join us for the 26th Annual Cornshucking Frolic at Horne Creek Farm on Saturday, October 21 from 10 am – 5pm. Admission fees are as follows: Adults: $8.00, Children 6 – 12: $5.00, & Children 5 & Under: Free. [Payment by cash or check only].

Heritage activities are sure to please the whole family. Surry Beekeepers, quilting, basket weaving, log hewing, blacksmithing, wagon rides, a grist mill demonstration, cooking on a woodstove, plowing, chair caning, cider, apple butter & molasses demonstrations, display of quilts, antique farm equipment, seven bands playing Traditional ,Bluegrass, & Gospel music, plus much more!. Food available throughout the day for a nominal fee: Chicken Stew, BBQ, Ham Biscuits, Pintos & Cornbread, Fried Pies, Sonkers, Ice Cream, and Beverages. Finish off by shopping at the HCF country store and with our vendors. No pets (other than service animals) allowed. No alcoholic beverages allowed. Canceled in the event of heavy rain.

Fall NCSBA Master Beekeeper Testing

The testing sites, dates, and times for the FALL REGIONAL TESTING for the Master Beekeeper Program have been established.

If you are intending on testing at one of the two locations PLEASE BRING YOUR NCSBA MEMBERHIP CARD WITH YOU we MUST have a CURRENT NCSBA membership number. (thanks)

If you are studying for an exam coming up in October, be sure to check out the Games and Quizzes on the NCSBA website. They are new as of the first of September. A good suggestion would be to go through all six as a refresher.

Master Beekeeper Program TESTS
Announcement

FALL REGIONAL TESTING
FOR THE NCSBA’s MASTER BEEKEEPER PROGRAM:

Please bring your NCSBA membership card with you (we MUST have a current membership number)

WEST:
OCTOBER 21, 2017
9 am till NOON
N.C. Cooperative Extension Office at Wilkes County
416 Executive Drive
Wilkesboro, NC 28697

The web site, wilkes.ces.ncsu.edu has along side the title, “Wilkes County Center” a google icon for direction assistance. We have been advised that the location is GPS challenged so to help you locate the facility – note that it is located off SR 421 at exit 285, north 500 feet to Executive Drive on the left.

All tests start at 9 am
NO TEST issued after 10 am
There will be: written testing for Certified, Journeyman & Master Levels
There will be practical exams for Journeyman and Master Levels only.
Certified Practical Exams will not be issued at this time/location.

Questions: mbp@ncbeekeepers.org

Protective Measures of Beehives During Hurricanes

Hi everyone,

With uncertain track of hurricane Irma, there are some important considerations for beekeepers who may be affected by the heavy rain and winds. Please further disseminate to your local network of beekeepers.

First, make sure hive equipment is secured to resist strong winds. A simple brick on the top lid is likely to be insufficient to keep the lid from flying off in winds above 50 mph. A lidless hive can cause problems for the bees by introducing moisture and letting heat escape. Strapping the lid down with ratchet straps or securing with duct tape might be in order, particularly for outlying yards. The same is true for hive boxes, particularly if they are relatively new (i.e., the bees have not yet propolized them together sufficiently). Also consider removing unnecessary boxes (e.g., top-hive feeders) to minimize the wind profile.

Second, be sure to have the hives on sturdy stands or level ground. Entire beehives can be blown over by strong winds, particularly when they are fairly tall with many honey supers or are otherwise top heavy. If the hives are on tall or insecure stands, you can move them onto (dry) level ground temporarily to lessen the chances that they topple. Importantly, if you’re using solid bottom boards, be sure to have your hives tilting forward so that rain water does not pool and collect on the floor of the hive.

Third, beware of falling trees and tree limbs. These can be particularly problematic for beehives since they can completely crush all equipment and kill the entire colony. It is also hard to prevent with some sort of barrier or cover because of the sheer weight of many trees, so if you apiary is in a wooded location you may need to move the hives temporarily.

Fourth, make sure the hives are not in low-lying areas or those prone to flooding. River banks can be useful apiary locations because of their proximity to fresh water, but in flooding conditions entire apiaries can be tragically swept away. Be sure to move any beehives in flood plains until the waters have subsided. Beehives on the ground but in recessed areas can cause water to flood the entrances and may even suffocate the bees if not given an upper entrance.

Finally, following heavy rains like hurricanes, various local and state agencies have traditionally sprayed regions with stagnant water to control mosquito outbreaks. While important for public health, such insecticides can be extremely problematic for honey bees. If you are registered through the NCDA&CS, you will be contacted directly if your beehives are in an area schedule to be sprayed. If you are not registered, however, the state has no means to notify you and your bees may be at risk to insecticide exposure. Please consult the Agricultural Chemical manual for information and advice about how to mitigate exposure to pesticides.

Hope your bees stay safe and dry! Sincerely, David

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David R. Tarpy
Professor and Extension Apiculturist
Department of Entomology, Campus Box 7613
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC 27695-7613
TEL: (919) 515-1660
FAX: (919) 515-7746
LAB: (919) 513-7702
WEB: http://entomology.ces.ncsu.edu/profile/david-tarpy/
EMAIL: david_tarpy@ncsu.edu
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